iubenda Now Available For BuySellAds Users: Generate Your Own Privacy Policy!

iubenda is a privacy policy generator that automatically updates your site’s privacy policy to conform with current laws and best practices. You never have to update or keep track of these changes, since iubenda does it for you. This is why BuySellAds decided to partner with them. Simon Schmid of iubenda has written a short piece to introduce our publishers to privacy policies and explain why they’re important.

At iubenda we are constantly adding new clauses and observing the international privacy policy landscape. We host and automatically send updates to our users’ policies when global changes are needed.

As of a recent update iubenda’s privacy policy generator now has a clause for BuySellAds users. Therefore it’s now as easy as a click of a button to disclose your use of advertising technology to your users and display an appropriate privacy policy on your site along with the ads.

To celebrate this occasion we’ve decided to give BuySellAds users an introductory offer, for 50% off on their first year subscription with iubenda. You can claim your offer by using this coupon code.

iubenda BuySellAds Privacy Policy

There’s another thing that I would like to talk about now that we’ve made this offer. Even if you’re not taking us up on it, you may find it interesting to hear about some of the latest developments in the “Do Not Track” discussions that Todd Garland had written about earlier (FTC’s Proposed ‘Do Not Track’ List).

Do Not Track is a proposed technology that essentially allows users to tell websites they don’t want their browsing behavior tracked. Wikipedia defines DNT as follows in technical terms:

The Do Not Track (DNT) header is the proposed HTTP header field DNT that requests that a web application disable either its tracking or cross-site user tracking (the ambiguity remains unresolved) of an individual user. (…)”.

Until now there is no legal requirement for website operators to use DNT.

California, however, recently introduced Do Not Track amendments to their existing privacy regulations via Assembly Bill no. 370. This change affects everyone who either operates their site from California or who has users/consumers that reside in California. The CalOPPA now states:

(5) Disclose how the operator responds to Web browser “do not track” signals or other mechanisms that provide consumers the ability to exercise choice regarding the collection of personally identifiable information about an individual consumer’s online activities over time and across third-party Web sites or online services, if the operator engages in that collection. 

In other words, this change doesn’t bring a requirement to sites to implement Do Not Track technology, but a requirement to inform if you are in fact making use of DNT technology, or not. Therefore If you are making use of the technology, make sure that you outline exactly what this means for the user and how his DNT request is being honored.

These kind of changes are exactly why users have found iubenda helpful. It is both time-consuming and risky to track all the legal changes required of sites in today’s society, everything is moving too fast and is too disputed. Give iubenda a try, and see how easy it is to let them keep you at the top of your game.

  • vikas kumar (Викас)

    How does is matter, as to what the privacy policy is. Has anyone been ever sued for deficiencies in the privacy policy.?

    • Simon

      Hi Vikas, sorry I’ve only noticed the question now. There are a couple of things you can point to regarding this. Path is the most notoriously known app/site known that was sued because of their practices/privacy policy.

      How these things are handled depends a lot on the local customs. Germany for example has practices in place that allow competition to fine, then go to court.

      Also another thing you might want to consider is the fact that a lot of companies explicitly require for a privacy policy to be in place – like Google for Google Analytics. It’s mostly a requirement, but as for if it’s worth to be forgoing this requirement… that’s probably a very personal decision I wouldn’t want to interfere with.

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/ftc-path-settlement-shows-online-privacy-goes-beyond-the-policy/2013/02/01/b27395da-6ca5-11e2-ada0-5ca5fa7ebe79_story.html

  • Mangesh Thakur

    My website http://www.usauk-classifieds.com already have privacy policy page, But I dont know whether its sufficient content OR I need to write some more content on that